Netherlands Bioinformatics Conference 2014

Netherlands Bioinformatics Conference 2014

Jing Wang

JingWang.jpg

CV

Institute of Environmental Science & Research Ltd, at the National Centre for Biosecurity and Infectious Disease, New Zealand, website

Jing joined the pathogen discovery group at ESR in 2012 as a bioinformatician. Jing works on the “dry lab” side of the project: designing, developing and operating the computational pipelines for the analysis of next-generation sequencing data. She also is involved in a project at ESR to establish bioinformatics capacity for the analysis of these datasets.

Before working at ESR, Jing was a scientific programmer at the Massey Genome Centre and the Allan Wilson Centre, at Massey University between 2007 and 2011. From 2008 Jing has been working on her PhD under Professor Sven Hartmann (Clausthal University of Technology,, Germany) and Professor Peter Lockhart (Massey University, New Zealand). Her PhD topic is on scientific workflow modelling and automation. Jing expects to obtain her PhD in 2013.

Abstract

Title: Viral Metagenomics Applied to Human Health and Wildlife: What New Zealand Virus Hunters are working on?

Viral diseases have an enormous impact on human and wildlife health worldwide, yet little is known about the vast majority of viruses due to difficulties that are inherent to classical virology techniques and the sheer scale of unknown viromes. The detection of both known and unknown viruses in field samples using metagenomic sequencing, without any a priori knowledge, is a promising approach with many potential applications. Our ‘Virus Hunters’ project is funded by the ESR Strategic Core Fund and in the last few years we have developed significant capabilities in viral metagenomics. In this talk, we first present a number of examples from our own laboratory where we have applied high-throughput metagenomic sequencing to detect viruses in diverse fields such as; unsolved outbreaks of human gastrointestinal disease, bioaerosols in an occupational setting and specimens collected from unique New Zealand indigenous fauna, such as the Lesser Short-tailed bats (Mystacina tuberculata). Over the last few years the challenges associated with metagenomics have shifted from obtaining sequencing results to analysing and interpreting them. The bioinformatics analysis remains a critical component, which is constantly under development. In the second part of this talk, we highlight some of the major challenges and pipelines we have used for analysing viral metagenomic datasets

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